Evelyn Goh

Power, Restraint, and China’s Rise

Please note that this is a book manuscript review seminar: two chapters from the manuscript will be circulated ten days in advance and taken as read by participants. Please register for the event to receive the chapters in advance.

Finding a Way Forward: Strategic Diplomacy in Northeast Asia

Northeast Asia is rife with potential conflict, given US-China great power rivalry, ongoing differences over interpretations of history between Korea and Japan and between China and Japan, simmering maritime disputes in the East and South China Seas, and worries that tensions could escalate between Taiwan and the Mainland under the US presidency of Donald J. Trump. The articles in this cover package of Global Asia argue that now is the time for players in the region to embrace “strategic diplomacy.”

Is a ‘Grand Bargain’ the Way Forward in Northeast Asia?

As strategic efforts are defined in part by their ultimate “big picture” goals, Evelyn Goh addresses the question of what the endpoint should be for strategic diplomacy in Northeast Asia.

Does China get what it wants in East Asia?

Does China get what it wants in East Asia?

China's South China Sea stance must be able to withstand the Singapore test

Singapore has neither the ability nor intention to hurt China. If China is willing to listen to its Asian neighbours and make adjustments, it will be the stronger for it.

How should Southeast Asia respond to the South China Sea ruling?

Southeast Asia has descended into a maritime insecurity spiral since the April–June 2012 stand-off at Scarborough Shoal between Chinese maritime security forces and the Philippine Navy, which motivated Manila to initiate legal arbitration proceedings in The Hague.

Washington welcome as China flexes muscle in Southeast Asia’s waters

America needs to deepen and sustain its strategic interests in Southeast Asia in response to a strong regional demand for a robust American presence, especially in light of China’s growing military, economic and diplomatic influence, says a new report co-authored by two experts from ANU College of Asia and the Pacfic launched today.

SDSC scholars on managing the great powers in Southeast Asia

A collection of papers and contributors in a Special Forum, recently published in the Asan Forum, examines recent thinking in Australia and three states in ASEAN—Indonesia, Vietnam, and Myanmar. The coverage reaches beyond their attitudes to the Sino-US struggle over sovereignty and freedom of navigation to broader questions of foreign policy, emphasizing how domestic leadership is impacting strategic choices as the regional security situation grows more dangerous.

Emerging U.S. Security Partnerships in Southeast Asia

The Centre for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS) recently hosted a panel discussion in Washington DC, on Tuesday, 1 December 2015, on the Emerging U.S. Security Partnerships in Southeast Asia Project.

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